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September is National Preparedness Month

Posted on 9/4/2012 by Quintana Stewart

September is National Preparedness Month

September is National Preparedness Month. This is a nationwide effort held each September to encourage Americans to take simple steps to prepare for emergencies in their homes, businesses, and schools. National Preparedness Month is sponsored by the U.S. Department of Homeland Security. The goal of the month is to increase public awareness about the importance of preparing for emergencies and to encourage individuals to TAKE ACTION! Preparing makes sense and it’s as easy as 1, 2, 3!

Step 1: Build a Kit

Build a Kit, which includes items like non-perishable food and bottled water. The kit should also include:

  • Wind-up or battery-operated radio
  • Wind-up or battery-operated flashlight
  • Extra batteries
  • Copies of prescription medications and medical supplies
  • Bedding and clothing, including sleeping bags and pillows
  • A first aid kit
  • Copies of important documents: driver’s license, Social Security card, proof of residence, insurance policies, wills, deeds, birth and marriage certificates, tax records, etc.

Make sure you have a “to-go bag” ready in case you need to evacuate, including:

  • Wind-up or battery-operated radio
  • Wind-up or battery-operated flashlight
  • Extra batteries
  • First aid kit
  • Maps
  • Important documents such as proof of residence, pictures of your family including pets, insurance policies, and tax records
  • Comfortable clothing and blankets
  • Unique family needs such as prescription medications, pet supplies, infant supplies or any other unique need your family may have

Step 2: Make a Plan

Prepare your family

  • Make a Family Emergency Plan. Your family may not be together when disaster strikes, so it is important to know how you will contact one another, how you will get back together and what you will do in case of an emergency
  • Plan places where your family will meet, both within and outside of your immediate neighborhood.
  • It may be easier to make a long-distance phone call than to call across town, so an out-of-town contact may be in a better position to communicate among separated family members.
  • You may also want to inquire about emergency plans at places where your family spends time: work, child care and school. If no plans exist, consider volunteering to help create one.
  • Plan to Evacuate
  • Identify ahead of time where your family will meet, both within and outside of your immediate neighborhood.
  • Identify several places you could go in an emergency, a friend's home in another town, a motel or public shelter.
  • If you do not have a car, plan alternate means of evacuating.
  • If you have a car, keep a half tank of gas in it at all times in case you need to evacuate.
  • Take your Emergency Supply Kit.
  • Take your pets with you, and know ahead of time if the hotel/motel or shelter you plan to stay in will accept pets. Bring a carrier, food and water, and your pet’s vaccination record.

Step 3: Be Informed

Before a disaster, learn how you will know there is an impending hazardous event. Familiarize yourself with the signs of events that come without warning and learn how to receive advance alerts and warnings for predictable hazards like hurricanes. Knowing about the local emergency plans for shelter and evacuation and local emergency contacts will help you develop your household plan and will also aid you during a crisis.

Familiarize yourself with the terms used to identify a hurricane.

  • A hurricane watch means a hurricane is possible in your area. Be prepared to evacuate. Monitor local radio and television news outlets or listen to NOAA Weather Radio for the latest developments.
  • A hurricane warning is when a hurricane is expected in your area. If local authorities advise you to evacuate, leave immediately.
  • Hurricanes are classified into five categories based on their wind speed, central pressure, and damage potential. Category 3 and higher hurricanes are considered major hurricanes, though Categories 1 and 2 are still extremely dangerous and warrant your full attention.

Prepare Your Home

  • Cover all of your home's windows with pre-cut plywood or hurricane shutters to protect your windows from high winds.
  • Plan to bring in all outdoor furniture, decorations, garbage cans and anything else that is not tied down.
  • Keep all trees and shrubs well-trimmed so they are more wind resistant.
  • Secure your home by closing shutters, and securing outdoor objects or bringing them inside.
  • Turn off utilities as instructed. Otherwise, turn the refrigerator thermostat to its coldest setting and keep its doors closed.
  • Turn off propane tanks.
  • Ensure a supply of water for sanitary purposes such as cleaning and flushing toilets. Fill the bathtub and other large containers with water.

The information above is a just a sample of what residents can do to prepare. More information about preparedness can be found at the following websites:

 

Mission Statement

The mission of the Forsyth County Department of Public Health is to prevent disease and promote a healthy community through regulation, education and partnerships.

Adopted by the Board of Health 10/2/13.

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