• By Don Dwiggins
  • Posted Friday, October 30, 2009

The Harlem Renaissance: An Explosion of African American Creativity

In the 1920s and 1930s, the soulful rhythms of blues and jazz led to an explosion of African American creativity. During this period, known as the Harlem Renaissance, musicians, dancers, visual artists, writers and scholar sought to define their African heritage in American culture. In this program, “The Harlem Renaissance: An Explosion of African American Creativity,” North Carolina Humanities Council Road Scholar Dr. Emily Seelbinder explores the origins of the Harlem Renaissance and examines some of the art, music and literature that came out of that period.

“The Harlem Renaissance: An Explosion of African American Creativity,” is a partnership of the Winston-Salem Writers and FCPL’s On the Same Page: The Big Read community program. This project is made possible by a grant from the North Carolina Humanities Council, a statewide nonprofit affiliate of the National Endowment for the Humanities.

Wednesday, November 4th in the Central Library auditorium at 7pm. For more information, call Candace Brennan or Rob Norwood at 336-703-3020.

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