About our Branch

Carver School Road Library The Carver School Road Branch of the Forsyth County Public Library is one of the most innovative branches in the library system. It was conceived as a joint venture with Forsyth Technical Community College (FTCC) as a way to serve the educational needs of an underserved population in Forsyth County. It has grown into a dynamic branch with its own unique offerings to the community. Day cares and schools are within walking distance of this campus setting.

The library building covers 10,000 square feet and played host to over 65,000 visits last year. Melisa Williams is the branch manager.

Besides serving as a branch library, Carver School Road Branch also functions as the library for a satellite campus of FTCC and strives to support the curriculum needs of its students. FTCC is not the only school for which the branch provides library resources. Quality Education Institute, a nearby charter school without a library of its own, also looks to this branch for its needs.

The Carver School Road Branch is one of only two branches that offers assistive technology that allows the physically handicapped the same free computer and internet access as other Forsyth County residents. Carver also has contemporary Afrocentric furnishings to showcase its beautiful design and to convey a strong sense of the community’s African heritage.

The future holds challenges with the branch’s customers with a diverse assortment of library needs. One of the most exciting will be adapting to the rapidly changing needs of the FTCC students, especially in the area of technology.

Branch History

The Carver School Road Branch Library is located in the Mazie Woodruff Center, which includes a satellite campus of FTCC. In 1992, Forsyth County bought the land for the complex, and officials planned the center using community input.

The Library was dedicated and opened to the public on August 6, 1998. This branch has offered innovative programming like Herstory — a program designed to give voice to the narrative history of older African-American women — beginning in March 2005.

One former library supervisor was Lois Leggett.